News

Gov. Patrick signs 1913 law repeal, MassHealth Equality bill

Ethan Jacobs
Bay Windows
Jul 31, 2008
With two strokes of the pen Gov. Deval Patrick opened the borders of the Commonwealth to out-of-state same-sex couples hoping to marry and granted equal Medicaid benefits to married same-sex couples in Massachusetts.

With two strokes of the pen Gov. Deval Patrick opened the borders of the Commonwealth to out-of-state same-sex couples hoping to marry and granted equal Medicaid benefits to married same-sex couples in Massachusetts. Patrick signed the two major pieces of LGBT-rights legislation, a bill repealing the so-called 1913 law and the MassHealth Equality bill, at a press conference July 31 in front of the Grand Staircase in the State House, flanked by House Speaker Sal DiMasi, state Sen. Dianne Wilkerson, dozens of lawmakers, and a crowd of LGBT advocates.

How they voted

Max Gelber
Bay Windows
Jul 30, 2008
The bill to repeal the 1913 law passed on a roll call vote of 119 to 36, with three House members not voting.

The bill to repeal the 1913 law passed on a roll call vote of 119 to 36, with three House members not voting. Here is how the members voted. Names in bold indicate lawmakers who voted in a way that contrasted with how they voted on the anti-gay marriage amendment at the June 2007 constitutional convention.

Mass. House Repeals 1913 Law Banning Nonresident Gay Marriages

Kerry Eleveld
The Advocate
Jul 30, 2008
The Massachusetts house voted Tuesday to repeal a law that had prohibited out-of-state gay couples from legally marrying in the Bay State. By a count of 118-35, legislators voted down the 1913 law that nullified any marriage performed in Massachusetts that was not legal in a couple's home state. The state senate approved repeal earlier this month, and the bill will now hit the desk of Gov. Deval Patrick, who has pledged to sign it, within the next week.

The Massachusetts house voted Tuesday to repeal a law that had prohibited out-of-state gay couples from legally marrying in the Bay State. By a count of 118-35, legislators voted down the 1913 law that nullified any marriage performed in Massachusetts that was not legal in a couple's home state. The state senate approved repeal earlier this month, and the bill will now hit the desk of Gov. Deval Patrick, who has pledged to sign it, within the next week.

Mass. House votes to let out-of-state gays marry

Glen Johnson
Boston Globe
Jul 29, 2008
The Massachusetts House voted Tuesday to repeal a 1913 law that had been used to block gay marriages involving out-of-state couples, all but assuring that the state will allow same-sex couples to wed regardless of where they live.

=BOSTON -- The Massachusetts House voted Tuesday to repeal a 1913 law that had been used to block gay marriages involving out-of-state couples, all but assuring that the state will allow same-sex couples to wed regardless of where they live.

The 119-36 vote came after the state Senate approved the repeal earlier this month, and Gov. Deval Patrick has said he will sign the bill. The measure requires one more procedural vote in each chamber before it is to the governor.

OUT-OF-STATE MARRIAGE LAW FACES OBSTACLES TO REPEAL IN HOUSE

Kyle Cheney
State House News
Jul 21, 2008
With time to take up controversial matters in the 2007-2008 legislative session running short and lawmakers gearing up for reelection campaigns, some House members worry the emotionally charged issue of repealing the 1913 law could fail to emerge in time. Formal sessions of the Legislature end on July 31.



STATE HOUSE, BOSTON, JULY 21, 2008.....The Senate's move last week to repeal a 95-year-old law that has been used to block out-of-state gay couples from marrying in Massachusetts prompted celebration from gay rights supporters and scorn from opponents.

But with time to take up controversial matters in the 2007-2008 legislative session running short and lawmakers gearing up for reelection campaigns, some House members worry the emotionally charged issue could fail to emerge in time. Formal sessions of the Legislature end on July 31.

A 1913 Law Dies to Better Serve Gay Marriages

PAM BELLUCK and KATIE ZEZIMA
New York Times
Jul 16, 2008
Massachusetts may have been the first state to legalize same-sex marriage for its residents, but when California last month invited out-of-state gay and lesbian couples to get married, the potential economic benefits did not go unnoticed here. Now Massachusetts wants to extend the same invitation.

BOSTON -- Massachusetts may have been the first state to legalize same-sex marriage for its residents, but when California last month invited out-of-state gay and lesbian couples to get married, the potential economic benefits did not go unnoticed here. Now Massachusetts wants to extend the same invitation.

Massachusetts Senate votes to end gay marriage restriction

Stephen Braun
LA Times
Jul 16, 2008
The Massachusetts Senate on Tuesday voted to repeal an obscure 1913 law that has been used to keep out-of-state same-sex couples from marrying there.



The Massachusetts Senate on Tuesday voted to repeal an obscure 1913 law that has been used to keep out-of-state same-sex couples from marrying there.

Legislators in the state House of Representatives in Boston are expected to take similar action today, and Gov. Deval Patrick has promised to sign the repeal. The move could allow gays and lesbians from other states to marry in Massachusetts within weeks.

Senate passes bill to repeal 1913 law

Ethan Jacobs
Bay Windows
Jul 15, 2008
Without fanfare or dissent the Massachusetts Senate passed on a voice vote July 15 a bill to repeal the statute known as the 1913 law, bringing Massachusetts one step closer to opening its doors to same-sex couples from across the country to get married in the state.

Without fanfare or dissent the Massachusetts Senate passed on a voice vote July 15 a bill to repeal the statute known as the 1913 law, bringing Massachusetts one step closer to opening its doors to same-sex couples from across the country to get married in the state.

State sees economics of gay marriage

Eric Moskowitz
Boston Globe
Jul 15, 2008
Morality, personal liberty, and constitutional law have been the usual battlegrounds in the fight over gay marriage. Now Governor Deval Patrick's administration is injecting something a bit more pedestrian to the debate: economic development.



Morality, personal liberty, and constitutional law have been the usual battlegrounds in the fight over gay marriage. Now Governor Deval Patrick's administration is injecting something a bit more pedestrian to the debate: economic development.

A study conducted for the state's Executive Office of Housing and Economic Development predicts that an economic boomlet in hotel bookings, banquets, and wedding cakes would result from repealing a 1913 state law that prevents gay and lesbian couples from most other states from marrying in Massachusetts.

Mass. Legislature to Take Up 1913 Law Tomorrow

William Henderson
New England Blade
Jul 14, 2008
The Mass. Legislature is expected to discuss next week a bill to repeal the 1913 law that keeps out-of-state same-sex couples from getting married in Massachusetts, with several legislators going on the record with the New England Blade on Wednesday as "confident" that the bill will pass and the law, once and for all, repealed.

UPDATE 7/14: A vote is scheduled in the senate for tomorrow, Tuesday July 15th on the third reading of the bill to repeal the 1913 law. Check back here for continued updates.

The Mass. Legislature is expected to discuss next week a bill to repeal the 1913 law that keeps out-of-state same-sex couples from getting married in Massachusetts, with several legislators going on the record with the New England Blade on Wednesday as "confident" that the bill will pass and the law, once and for all, repealed.